Mission Statement

 

The mission of the Trumbull Career & Technical Center is to enable our students to become productive members of society by providing for our students a comprehensive combination of academic and career-technical skills and experience in a safe, non-hostile diverse environment. This will prepare them to select from the widest possible range of post-secondary career and educational options that are commensurate with the students' aptitudes and interests.

 
TCTC 35th Anniversary

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About Us

History of Trumbull Career & Technical Center 

The congress of the United States passed the Vocational Education Act of 1963. Its purpose was to provide an adequate vocational education opportunity for youths and adults. With the passing of this legislation into law, vocational education would become a reality in the State of Ohio.

Basic information concerning the studies of employment and the needs of the Trumbull County communities had been made by the Ohio State Employment Service, the Bureau of Unemployment Compensation, student and business surveys. The results of the surveys were clear. Twelve percent of our job market requires a college education. Consequently, schools must prepare youths to enter the other 88% of the job market upon graduation from high school.

Several school districts in Trumbull County could be joined together in a joint vocational education program for area high school youth, out-of-school youth and adults. The programs to be offered at this facility were to include such areas as agriculture, business education, distributive education, home economic education, and trade and industrial education.

If this joint vocational facility was to go into operation, it had to have a sponsoring board of education. The first sponsoring board of education was Niles City Schools: it was followed by Hubbard Exempted Village School District. Each school system that wanted to belong to the joint vocational school district had to send a letter of intent to join the district. Those letters of intent were turned over to the State Board of Education. In August of 1966, the first board of education was organized for the Trumbull County Joint Vocational School District August 17, 1966.

On April 7, 1974 the Joint Vocational Board was dissolved after five levy failures. On August 4, 1974 the JVS Board was reorganized. On August 21, 1975 a plan for the TCJVS was submitted to the Ohio State Department of Education for seven districts: Bloomfield, Champion, Farmington, Hubbard, Mathews, Newton Falls, and Southington. On March 18, 1976 a 2.9 mill combined tax issue was passed by these districts. The school districts of Bristol, Brookfield, Girard, Joseph Badger, LaBrae, Lakeview, Liberty, and Maplewood also joined the Trumbull County Joint Vocational School District. These fifteen school districts would be under the guidance of Leo Difford, who was the Trumbull County Director of Vocational Education for the Trumbull County Joint Vocational School District and who later became the first superintendent of the district on October 1, 1975.

After the levy passed, it was recertified to 2.4 mills on November 7, 1975 by the County Auditor. The process of planning the JVS was under way. Eighty-two acres of property on Mahoning Avenue had been selected as the site for the vocational school. This land was previously the “County Farm” and on June 23, 1976 the Trumbull County Commissioners leased it to the TCJVS.

The groundbreaking of the Trumbull County Joint Vocational School occurred on April 15, 1977. Warren City joined the JVS in September of 1992. The TCJVS name was changed to The Trumbull Career & Technical Center on July 1, 2000 to better reflect the school’s additional state mandates. Beginning with the 2002 school year four additional school districts joined the Career Center: Lordstown, McDonald, Niles, and Weathersfield.

The Trumbull County Joint Vocational School opened its doors to students on September 6, 1978; dedication ceremonies occurred on November 12, 1978. Board members at the time of the dedication included: Thomas M. Cooksey, Jr., President; Stanley Woofter, Vice President; Ronnie L. Burke; Marjorie Fenton; Beverly A. Friend; Ray L. Hicks; Albert Nye; and Beverly A. Richards, Treasurer. The total cost of this facility was 9.5 million dollars of which 4.84 million dollars came from the multi-purpose levy. Matching funds from the State of Ohio totaled 4.61 million dollars. In 2006 an Adult wing was opened, 44,000 sq. ft at a cost of 6.4 million dollars. Today TCTC has over seven acres under roof.

Of the 49 vocational districts in the State of Ohio, Trumbull County was one of the last vocational facilities to go into operation.

Ohio is one of the few states which have a diversified and complete program in vocational education. With the completion of the Trumbull County Joint Vocational School, 97.4% of youths and adults have vocational education available to them to gain the necessary skills and technical knowledge to obtain a job or to prepare to advance to a better job.

Moving forward into the future TCTC H.S. will have all classes certified as Tech Prep by 2013 and will continue offering Dual Credit Classes which give both H.S. and college credit simultaneously.


 

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